Sheldon Shore Lecture

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Karen Goldberg
September 20, 2019
4:10PM - 5:10PM
Location
CBEC 130

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Add to Calendar 2019-09-20 16:10:00 2019-09-20 17:10:00 Sheldon Shore Lecture

Dr. Karen Goldberg

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Molecular Oxygen as a Reagent in Late Transition Metal Organometallic Chemistry

From environmental and economic standpoints, molecular oxygen represents the ideal oxidant for chemical transformations. It is readily available, inexpensive (particularly if used without separation from air) and environmentally benign. However, more expensive and/or hazardous oxidants are often employed in homogeneous metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. An insufficient knowledge of how transition metal complexes react with molecular oxygen has inhibited catalyst design of effective aerobic systems. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of the reactions of oxygen with various late metal complexes, including metal alkyls and hydrides, will be presented along with our nascent mechanistic understanding of these reactions. The generality of these aerobic oxidation reactions and the potential for incorporation into hydrocarbon functionalization strategies will be discussed. 

Reception to follow in CBEC Lobby

CBEC 130 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry chem-biochem@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

Dr. Karen Goldberg

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Molecular Oxygen as a Reagent in Late Transition Metal Organometallic Chemistry

From environmental and economic standpoints, molecular oxygen represents the ideal oxidant for chemical transformations. It is readily available, inexpensive (particularly if used without separation from air) and environmentally benign. However, more expensive and/or hazardous oxidants are often employed in homogeneous metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. An insufficient knowledge of how transition metal complexes react with molecular oxygen has inhibited catalyst design of effective aerobic systems. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of the reactions of oxygen with various late metal complexes, including metal alkyls and hydrides, will be presented along with our nascent mechanistic understanding of these reactions. The generality of these aerobic oxidation reactions and the potential for incorporation into hydrocarbon functionalization strategies will be discussed. 

Reception to follow in CBEC Lobby

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